P6

A healthy social life? Sociality, stress and indicators of health in wild redfronted lemurs (Eulemur rufifrons)

 
Dr. Cornelia Kraus, Göttingen
Dr. Claudia Fichtel, Göttingen

PhD student: Charlotte Defolie
 
 
Summary

The physiological stress response plays a pivotal role in mediating the link between sociality and health. The overall goal of this project is to shed light on this pathway in a primate species with a social system that deviates in several aspects from that of the better-studied anthropoid species. In redfronted lemurs both sexes exhibit high levels of affiliation and social tolerance, but at the same time evictions and takeovers quite regularly upset social stability. Our first aim is to identify important determinants shaping the link between social relationships and stress hormone levels, focusing on the role of social in/stability and sex differences. We will then investigate the association between stress hormone levels and two markers of immune function (C-reactive protein and Neopterin), testing predictions about the effects of acute and more long-term stress on these markers. Linking these first two steps, we aim to trace the social signal in immune marker variation mediated by stress using path analyses. To this end, we will include two additional health indicators, body condition and endoparasite burden in our models, both of which can also act as stressors and modulate immune function. In addition, we will test the hypothesis that high stress levels, poor condition and helminth burden increase host susceptibility to microparasite infection, which we will detect indirectly by monitoring immune marker levels. Apart from allowing us to quantify the relative importance of the sociality-stress-health link in our study species, this project will also contribute to furthering the non-invasive monitoring of immune function.
 
 
Presentation on conferences
 

Defolie C., Fichtel C., Heistermann M., Kraus C. 2017. So happy together? Ecological and social correlates of stress in wild redfronted lemurs (Eulemur rufifrons). European Federation of Primatology (Talk), Strasbourg, France.

Defolie C., Kraus C., Fichtel C., Heistermann M. 2017. Faeces matter! Non-invasive monitoring of stress and health in wild primates. European Federation of Primatology (Poster), Strasbourg, France.

Defolie C., Fichtel C., Heistermann M., Kraus C. 2017. Don’t worry, be healthy? Sociality, stress and indicators of health in wild redfronted lemurs (Eulemur rufifrons). Behaviour ISAB (Talk), Estoril, Portugal.

Defolie C., Fichtel C., Heistermann M., Kraus C. 2017. And they lived happily forever after? Ecological and social correlates of stress in wild redfronted lemurs. German Society for Primatology (Poster), Zurich, Switzerland.

Defolie C., Fichtel C., Kraus C. 2016. Sharing more than friendship? Social network and gastro-intestinal parasites in wild redfronted lemurs (Eulemur rufifrons). Networks in Biology symposium (Poster), Göttingen, Germany.

Defolie C., Fichtel C., Kraus C. 2015. Physiological stress and parasite infections in mammals.GÖZU meeting (talk), Göttingen, Germany.

Site & Species

Karte5 Madagaskar google

© google maps


Rotstirnmaki2